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>>> tonight, cease-fire, israel and hamas lay down their arms, for now. >> this is a critical moment for the region. the right thing for the state of israel is to exhaust this opportunity to obtain a long-term cease-fire. >> our brothers will guarantee the implementation of all of these understandings in this agreement. >> will the fragile peace hold? also, rudy giuliani on what it means. >> plus, we'll be talking about hillary clinton, the stars battle it out. this is "piers morgan tonight." good evening, big story tonight, celebrations in the middle east over the fragile peace, a cease-fire, the israeli president, netanyahu. >> we want the entire world to understand our people. and we can explain the faces, the pale faces of the leaders of the enemy, because they have failed in their attempt. >> i have toay that all of this was done with the firm support on the part of the leaders of the international community, and i would like especially to thank president barack obama for his unreserved support. >> questions on both sides and around the world. how long can peace last? i w
palestinian factions engaged in this military operation with israel. they're trying to get them to commit to a cessation of hostility force a period of 48 hours to allow for a longer truce to go into effect. the palestinians feel they have the upper hand here, and they are saying they will not stop their attacks into southern israel so long as israel maintains a siege on gaza. they want it lifted and they want guaranteed backed by the international community that israel will no longer engage and target and kill senior leaders of the palestinian factions here in gaza. they want all of these demands guaranteed by the international community. for its part israel wants to approach it from a different angle. they want a complete cessation of hostilities for 38 hours for so followed by a -- other concerns they have. the challenge for egypt is to try and close that gap as quickly as possible because essentially everyone here feels that they're running out of time. you have the israelis amassed on the border and palestinian factions still firing rockets and caught in the middle are the 19.6 milli
, this is the egyptian leader, has the direct contacts with hamas. neither united states or israel has that. the decision to send secretary clinton i'm told by white house aides is neither an acknowledgment things are close neither do they feel things got stuck. they feel heir presence, first in israel and then in ramallah in the west bank, meaning with the palestinian authority, then in cairo could nudge along the process to see if they could get to a point of some sort of negotiated cease-fire. as far as the united states is concerned, what spokesperson said, that begins with hamas stopping the rocket fire into israel and then a longer negotiated settlement, they hope, can be agreed upon. >> chuck todd live in cambodia. thanks so much. as chuck was just talking about, secretary of state hillary clinton is going to be heading directly from cambodia to israel to try to help work out a diplomatic solution to the violent escalation of tensions in gaza. nbc's chapman bell is live with us for the situation there. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as calls for a cease-fire grow, the violence does conti
israel today. one sent flying in the direction of jerusalem. israeli police said more than 60 rockets were fired by midday. thousands of israeli reservists remain gathered at the border with gaza. israel threatening to take the next step if if hamas doesn't stop the rocket fire into israel. the next step ground troops moving in. we want to bring in ambassador dennis ross, served as adviser to four presidents and is a mideast diplomacy analyst. it's great to have you with me today. big news coming within the last hour, al jazeera reporting that the ceasefire is going to be announced this evening in cairo. now egypt will reportedly be agreeing to oversee this plan which is said to include an easing of the crossroads into gaza. so peace appears to be eminent but what do you make of the transparency of what the outline of it deal is? >> well, i think we still need to see it implemented. having spent a lot of time in the middle east, done a lot of negotiations, one thing i know about this part of the world, nothing is concluded until you actually see it carried out. it's one thing to talk
assembly despite strong opposition by the u.s. and israel. here's israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu earlier today. >> the palestinians must recognize the jewish state. and they must be prepared to end the conflict with israel once and for all. none of these vital interests, these vital interests of peace, none of them appear in the resolution that will be put forward before the general assembly today. and that is why israel cannot accept it. >> joining me now to talk more about this, former state department mideast officer joel ruben. also palestinian italian journalist and msnbc contributor willa jabroe. both israel and the u.s. say the resolution violates agreements to solve issues through negotiations which broke down two years ago. on the heels of the recent violent clashes between gaza and israel is now the right time for this vote? >> well, it's a fate acomply that the vote is going to take place. it's been in the works for some time before -- really the bigger issue is how will the parties react after it? there's been a calm reaction to far. there should be one. they need to
conflict between hamas and israel. the last 24 hours have been particularly deadly. 11 civilians killed in gaza city when israeli missiles leveled a two-story home. four of the dead, children. >> as for israel, not letting up with its air assault. right now, representatives from the two sides are in egypt, trying to negotiate a cease-fire. but they're not talking directly to one another. cnn's anderson cooper is live for us this morning from gaza city. anderson, good morning. set the scene for us there. >> yeah, good morning. as you said it has been another day of explosions here and rockets being fired toward israel. i saw at least five rockets being fired over the last several hours toward israel from here in gaza city. which is where most of the rockets are being fired from. and also a number of explosions incoming rockets, or air strikes by israeli forces throughout the day. at least more than a dozen that i've heard over the last several hours. don't have any reports, really, on casualties today. we just had a rocket go off right there. neil, if you can zoom in. you can see the tra
edition of "msnbc live." developing now the ceasefire between israel and hamas may have been broken. palestinian medical services say a man was killed by israeli forces on the gaza side of the border. israel's army has not yet been able to verify the death but this all comes after a day and a half of calm in the region following those eight days of rocket and missile attacks that left nearly 170 dead. we have reporters on both sides of the conflict. we begin with ayman mohyeldin in gaza. to the details of this possible break in the ceasefire. what do you know on that? >> reporter: good morning, alex. palestinian medical services have identified the body of a 23-year-old they say was killed by israeli gunshots as he and about 3,300 other people approach the gaza/israel border. now generally speaking israel and gaza border is mostly farmland. there is an area that is about 300 meters or so that the israeli have declared a no-go zone. that has been used to attack israeli border posts and attempts to kidnap israeli soldiers. for the most part they are aware that is a no-go zone. followi
's commitment to israel's security and right to defend itself. the cease-fire announced 90 minutes ago with secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister standing side by side. secretary clinton calling the agreement a step in the right direction. >> united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza. the rocket attacks must end. a broader, calmer return. the people of the region deserve the chance to live free from fear and violence and today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. >> today's announcement follows secretary clinton's diplomatic barnstorm through the middle east and made stops in egypt, west bank and egypt. and it follows more than a week of cross border rocket fire exchanges between israel and hamas in gaza. now, that has left 100 people dead. joining me now from gaza is nbc news foreign correspondent amman mulhadeen. i saw you turn around and notice the night skylight up behind you. that was a minute within the cease-fire taking effect. do we know that's rocket fire coming in behind you? >> reporter: it
needed to be there in person. she'll travel to israel first and then ramallah in the west bank and cairo to try to curtail the violence. >> clinton will emphasize the united states interests in a peaceful outcome. an outcome that can lead to improved conditions for the civilian residents of gaza. >> there are a couple of encouraging signs on the road to peace. today egypt's president said the aggression in gaza would end today and radio was saying a ceasefire could come tonight. since the fighting started a week ago more than 100 palestinians have been killed including 54 civilians according to the associated press. three israeli civilians have died. let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv for us and "washington post" columnist e.j. deion. mar martin, let me start with you. it sounds like, at least in the last couple of hours, they're getting closer to a deal. where do things stand? >> reporter: that's right. as you said, it is very encouraging signs. the fact that not only hillary clinton is coming and that the egyptian president said what he said and the israeli radio quoted
, it will be a familiar scene on the ground here in israel for people in tel aviv and all across the country. this was a tactic used a lot by palestinian militants about a decade ago. in recent years they haven't seen it. the last bus blast was back in 2004. and just soon after it, a spokesman for hamas came out with a statement calling it a heroic attack. chris? >> stephanies go income tel aviv for us. thank you. i want to play for you something hillary clinton had to say yesterday. >> america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid and unwavering. that is why we believe it is essential to de-escalate the situation in gaza. the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> obviously, there's a lot at stake here for the people who live in the region, for the entire international community. but politically, i'm wondering what's at stake for hillary clinton and for this white house that seems to be approaching the middle east process differently than it did in the first term. >
in the middle east, where the fragile truce between israel and gaza hamas rulers appears to be holding 19 hours after it began. the truce was brokered by egypt and ended eight days of fighting. the big question is, will it last. we have reporters throughout the region for you. martin fletcher is in tel aviv, and jim is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying
to stop the rocket fire into israel which as far as the united states is concerned and ben rhodes made this clear, that's the number one priority before nip other part of this negotiation is done. when you think of the time line, the president up late after all of the summit. he's here for a couple of summits. gaza has overshadowed all of that. he was up late. he was up with morsi and netanyahu. morsi is the conduit into hamas. the united states doesn't have any direct conversations with hamas. the conduit is morsi. gets off the phone with netanyahu. decides to call morsi back. after that, the president and the secretary huddle. time for shuttle diplomacy. so the decision to send her there and it comes with some risk. the united states putting that much skin in the game getting that involved if suddenly nothing is prevented and in 72 hours a ground invasion begins, a little diplomatic egg on the face of the united states and secretary clinton. there's potential reward down the road. this could be a big feather in her cap at the end of her career. but toss that aside right now, the big
on the reason. >> president obama has asked me to come to israel with a very clear message. >> what is that message? and will it work? plus we have republicans coming down hard on chris christie. >> i've got devastation on the shore. i've got floods in the northern part of my state. if you think right now that i give about presidential politics, then you don't know me. >> tonight we have how rupert murdoch made governor christie eat those words. plus cenk may be on vacation, but he's always working and he has a piece on money and politics. >> if we don't fundamentally change the way these elections are financed, you're going to keep getting candidates who are in favor of their funders, of course! >> that and an awesome elbow of the day. today is the birth of joseph r. biden. ladies and gentlemen, it's showtime. [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> well, the calm in the middle east is non-existent. as a matter of fact, today was supposed to be a day of trying to work things out. hillary clinton, secretary of state, broke off her trip to asia, went to israel today. the bombing as we just learned from
both sides lay down their arms. >> israel will not hesitate to do what is necessary to defend our people. >> that, of course from abc news. i am graced once again by the presence of trisha rose, professor from brown university, michael hastings of "buzzfeed" and of "rolling stone." what's up? you know, hillary clinton secretary of state, went to israel today. she cut off that asian sort of farewell tour that she was on but she went there in the hopes that something could be worked out. there are rumors of a truce. there are rumors there is going to be a cease-fire. michael, as you look at what the country's mission is, what's the first thing that resonates with you when you see her on the ground there? >> what the white house has to show is they have an active involvement in this. they're going to broker a deal. this has been a tradition of the u.s. to come in when tensions flare to work something out and hopefully a lasting peace not one that just lasts a couple of years. >> first thing that struck me when
the cease-fire because israel's response was quick. they fired warning shots at the palestinians, in the end they ended up killing one of the forces. palestinians are going to be protesting that to the united nations. but at the same time hamas also responded quickly. today they're keeping protesters away from the fence. they don't want any more of these kinds of clashes with israelis see as provocations. so i think it's clear both sides do want the cease-fire to continue. they both have a very strong vested interest in doing so. and that kind of incident yesterday, which led to the unfortunate death of one palestinian, i doubt that will be repeated in the days to come. the emphasis on both sides is going to be on the next stage, which as you mentioned, which is outlining the details, dealing with the details of what the cease-fire is, what it leads to. what they've got so far is what they've called quiet for quiet. both sides not shooting. what's next is the beginning of the negotiations. it's quite clear what the two sides want although it's going to appear complicated. it's simple and it'
. cc >> eliot: while the election has focused on future hamas and israel continue an escalation of their conflict? we begin with the testimony of general petraeus. the testimony was closed to the public but inside members were shown realtime video of the attack taken by predator drone. petraeus believed immediately it was a terrorist act and opinions were changed by other agencies before being released. i assured that changes were not made for political reasons. he concluded that ambassador's rice intelligence reflected the best intelligence at the time that could be released publicly. >> the problem with what susan rice is not what she had stuck shuck with it. she went beyond that. >> meanwhile, gas are a firing rockets and israel responded by removing 16,000 reswervist troops to the border. today strongly asserted egypt's support, i repeat. he warned that quote, egypt today is different from egypt yesterday and the asias today are different from the asias yesterday. joining me now pj crowley. now a professor at george washington university. thank you for joining us. >> a pleas
gauze why and israel and playing out in egypt. bring us up to speed. the rebels made some advancements. >> the rebels have scored some successes. they have captured a couple of rather small but still significant military installations, one little air base, they got a tank out of it, they destroyed a couple of helicopters, destroyed another couple of tanks that was seen -- because it was very close to damascus, seen as a major victory for them. moreover, moreover they changed their strategy. their strategy of trying to go into a major city, take it, and hold it. and they get pulverized in bombing campaigns that took so much of a toll on the civilian population. going right after the military, the military centers in and doing so, they're gaining arms. and expertise. there are more people that are joining them, the syrian military still a formidable force and the rebels probably not a match for them toe to toe but gaining strength. >> we know the geography, turkey to the north, turkey considering putting missiles on the border now? >> they're asking nato to consider it. they're sending a
him to account for what he does domestically and regionally. >> in cairo today delegations from israel and hamas are there for indirect talks to work on details beyond the initial cease-fire. i have a list of topics they're expected to cover, opening border crossings, easing israel's economic blockade and what do you expect from these discussions today? what are the chances any progress will be made? >> i think these already tough discussions. all the leverage that comes with having the military action on going is gone now. the pressure to make tough concessions and compromises is diminished and morsi is very distracted biz his own domestic crisis. i think you can have these talks go on for some time without major changes and that sets up the prospect for more conflict in the future. >> during this time if it takes awhile will the cease-fire hold? >> i think right now neither side has interest and i think more israel if iran starts to rearm hamas very quickly and i think they will see that as an untenable situation and it is possible you could over the next weeks see a resumption in so
shuck with it. she went beyond that. >> meanwhile, gas are a firing rockets, and israel responded by removing 16,000 reswervist troops to the border. today strongly asserted egypt's support, i repeat. he warned that quote, egypt today is different from egypt yesterday today are different from the asias yesterday. joining me now pj crowley. now a professor at george washington university. thank you for joining us. >> a pleasure, eliot. >> eliot: it seems to me with all this screaming and shouting about susan rice's testimony. the only thing that struck me for legitimate upset might be that general petraeus has said he believed it was a terrorist and the u.n. ambassador said originally it was not that. is that a legitimate area of some investigation by congress? >> in fairness to susan rice. she did not say it was an act of terrorist. she didn't rule it out either. she made clear her understanding of what happened would evolve over time. the significance of general petraeus on the hill is begin a more fullsome process to answer questions that still don't have complete answers. the s
riding on this. palestinians not only believe he was poisoned there's only one culprit, israel. if he was appointed and it was by israel, of course, who knows what the ramifications of that would be on the street. yeah, they want to make sure that the investigation is done as fairly and as objectively as possible. so what happened is they took 20 specimens from his bones today. those 20 specimens were divided into three, and each set of investigators from russia, france and switzerland took their 20 samples. they'll be doing separate investigations, and then they correlate the results to the end and we'll see whether they will agree or whether there's any dispute. there's a lot riding on this, of course. >> martin fletcher live in tel aviv. thank you. >>> new allegations involving former elmo puppeteer kevin clash. it tops our look at stories around the "news nation" today. a third lawsuit accuses clash of having sex with an underage boy. the latest accuser said he began a relationship with clash back in 2000. he was 16 years old at the time. a spokes woman for clash says, quote, mr.
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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